Sad end to loose dogs

Carla
Carla Allen
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Christmas was a sad affair for the family of Michel and Trudy Comeau near Eel Lake in Digby County.

On Dec. 19 their two German Shepards – Apollo (10 years) and Nyx (20 months) - got loose and headed for the woods.

The family searched for them by foot in the immediate vicinity, on a four-wheeler over a wider area and then by truck, all with no luck.

Three days later, Nyx returned noticeably injured. Trudy Comeau took her to a Yarmouth veterinarian for surgery. The vet discovered that the dog had been shot at least a day before, perhaps earlier. 

A Department of Natural Resources officer, called in by the vet, confirmed that the dog had been shot with a high power rifle. Nyx died from her injuries.

“We still look to no avail up the driveway every now and then to see if Apollo will be coming home but we know that he has met the same fate as Nyx,” said Comeau, who added she was experiencing grief, shock, and disillusionment that someone in her community would do such a thing.

“We have owned German Shepherds since 1986 and have been blessed, as each one of our dogs possessed a wonderful temperament. Our shepherds have always been family pets that loved attention from people.  We have never had an incident where anyone was ever intimidated by one of our dogs,” she said.

During the search for their missing pets Comeau says they encountered other people who said their dogs were missing as well but that they wished to remain anonymous.

Shawna Comeau says that in the three years she’s worked as municipal dog catcher for Clare, no one has contacted her to say their dogs have been shot.

“We’ve had calls about mistreated dogs or those being left out in the cold. Though I’m sure it’s happened (dogs shot), I never received the call.”

Sergeant Jeff Holmes, with the Meteghan RCMP detachment, says he’s experienced similar situations in other provinces. He pointed out that it’s important to keep pets in an enclosure for their protection.

“I think it’s best to have an enclosure as opposed to dogs being on a line or a tether. In my experience they’re safer if they are in a dog pen, run or fenced yard. If you have dogs running at large and they attack livestock or people, they may unfortunately end up being shot by someone.”

He added that if anyone believes their dogs have been shot, the detachment would certainly investigate the reports.

Comeau says that anyone who owns a pet knows it’s impossible to be 100 per cent sure it won’t explore the surrounding woods, especially when residing in a rural area. 

“But you do rely on the kindness of your neighbours, that if they see a dog, they will contact you. Our neighbours always did, even when our dogs crashed their child’s birthday party or an outside barbeque uninvited. They have called us and we went immediately to get them.  They were friendly dogs that loved people and children.”

Comeau added that they don’t wish the sadness and grief that their family has experienced over the holiday season on any other family.

“We want dog owners to be aware of someone shooting dogs in the Bangor to Meteghan Station area in the Municipality of Clare.”

The family is asking anyone that notices a dog wandering, lost, or wounded to contact the municipal dog catcher at 902-769-2388, 902-645-2833 or 902-778-1038, CIFA, the local radio station at 902-769- 2432 or the Meteghan RCMP detachment at 902-645-2326.

 

 

 

 

Organizations: Department of Natural Resources, Meteghan Station

Geographic location: Yarmouth, Clare, Bangor

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Recent comments

  • Heather M
    January 07, 2013 - 19:18

    It is a very sad state of affairs when humanity is such that two friendly family members (pets) could be slaughtered for sport or entertainment because they wandered off to play in the woods. Knowing the dogs as I did, with their playful and loving personalities, I cannot imagine the terror that they must have experienced in their final moments. Thoughts also go to the Comeau family who had to have such grief in their home during a time when their spirits should have been high with the season and welcoming their daughter home from her first term in University. Instead, they had to explain to their children, during Christmas of all times, that their loving pets were lost and then try in vain to keep the terrible news secret to protect the kids from the ugly truth. Only after watching their pain, disappointment and sorrow grow daily in failing to find their pets day after day did their parents finally relent and explain that they knew that their searching was in vain because they knew the dogs weren't coming home again. Then, and only then did they try in vain to salvage what was left of Christmas. I truly do not wish this experience on any other family and hope that the man who felt it just to kill such loved family pets so close to Christmas did himself have a much more joy filled Holiday, with his family and pets safe, happy and close by. I also hope that he has satisfaction that his act of terror on these animals impacted more than just the Comeau family, but the children of their extended family as well since these dogs were fixtures at family events for a decade. I end with one final wish, that everyone truly gets what they deserve in 2013, karma.

  • Robyn McKenzie
    January 07, 2013 - 12:14

    There is no limit to the cold cruelty that resides in some people and how they justify their vicious actions. Rest assured that the old saying "What goes around comes around" will haunt this murderer. The dogs are now angels but the family is left with the grief. God help this killer. As destiny has a way of wreaking judgement.

  • Rick
    January 07, 2013 - 10:54

    Whoever shot these dogs needs to be locked up. If anyone ever hurt my dogs, well lets just say I would be damn sure they could never do it again.