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Stunt shows stun at Wharf Rat Rally


Published on September 1, 2017

Melvin Urias throws his fist in the air after completing his round inside the globe of death.

©Sara Ericsson

DIGBY, NS – Wharf Rat Rally is a wild affair and are the people running its stunt shows.

Two motorcycle stunt shows wowed the crowd Friday, September 1 – The Urias Daredevils Globe of Death and the Jason Britton No Limit Extreme.

The first show was made up of the Urias family, who’ve been performing for five generations.

The family of performers includes Melvin, Jodie, Erwin, Geovi, along with Olga Surnina of Russia.

“We’re just the right amount of crazy,” said Erwin, who is Melvin’s brother, Jodie’s husband and Geovi’s father.

 

Stunts in the family

The family performs 400 to 500 shows annually throughout North America.

Friday marked their first time performing in Nova Scotia.

The globe they use was constructed by the original Urias performer, Erwin’s great-grandfather, nearly 100 years ago.

Of making a living performing such a dangerous sport, Erwin said the danger doesn’t scare them since they are well practiced and well-prepared.

“We practice, and we think about it just the right amount,” he said, adding that overthinking doesn’t help and can even cause trouble.

Stunts included one, two and three bikes simultaneously inside the globe, and even three inside while Jodie stood in the middle.

“It’s a family affair! We’re going to keep doing this and passing it on,” said Erwin.

 

A different kind of show

The Jason Britton No Limit Extreme show was made up of Ian Gaines and Jay Cruz.

Ian Gaines (pictured) and Jay Cruz performed with the Jason Britton No Limit Extreme. Britton was unable to attend.

©Sara Ericsson

Gaines has been performing since 2007, and Cruz since 2011.

After five years performing together with Britton, who was absent, the pair also travel around North America touring with their show.

“I got interested one day after playing football, when I saw some guys across the parking lot doing stunts with bikes,” said Gaines.

“After trying it out myself and getting many broken bones, I eventually started getting the hang of it and turned it from a hobby into a job.”

Cruz started as a kid and learned what he knows through his father, who he called the original hot head in his family.

“It’s my passion. I was a kid with a dream, and to this day I’m still dreaming,” said Cruz.

Stunting is, very obviously, not without its dangers. Both Gaines and Cruz recommend anyone considering the trade to get involved, but safely.

“Wear your gear, ride safe, learn what it is you’re trying to do, and then you can get out there and perform,” said Gaines.

“Enjoy your motorcycle. That’s really what it’s all about.”