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Maud Lewis show among new offerings at AGNS western branch

Maud Lewis painting, Lighthouse and Ferry at Cape Forchu, Yarmouth County, 1960s. Oil on board 31.4 x 33.7 cm. Collection of CFFI Ventures Inc. as collected by John Risley.
Maud Lewis painting, Lighthouse and Ferry at Cape Forchu, Yarmouth County, 1960s. Oil on board 31.4 x 33.7 cm. Collection of CFFI Ventures Inc. as collected by John Risley.

Lewis exhibition and 3 other shows to be in Yarmouth 6 months, starting Dec. 1

An exhibition of Maud Lewis paintings collected by John Risley is one of four new shows slated to open Dec. 1 at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia’s western branch in Yarmouth.

Aside from the Maud Lewis display, two of the new shows are photography-based – including one focusing on Sable Island – and another is a mix of digital mediums and photography. They are all scheduled to be on display for six months.

John Risley, co-founder of Clearwater Fine Foods, has been collecting Maud Lewis art on his company’s behalf for nearly 20 years. Fifty-seven of those pieces make up the new show at the AGNS in Yarmouth.

Colin Stinson, communications and marketing manager with the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, notes that Maud Lewis likely has never been more popular, thanks to Maudie, the film about Lewis that was a huge hit in the region when it came out earlier this year.

“The movie definitely generated a lot of interest around her and her work,” Stinson said, “and we’ve seen that reflected in Halifax.”

And, of course, given that Lewis was born and raised in Yarmouth, Stinson says the gallery is happy to bring this exhibition here.

Lewis – who later in life moved to Digby and eventually settled in Marshalltown, Digby County – became one of Canada’s best-known folk artists. She died in 1970 at the age of 67.

Other new shows

But the Maud Lewis exhibition is not the only new show visitors will be able to check out at the AGNS in Yarmouth, starting Dec. 1.

Harold Edgerton: The Man Who Made Time Stand Still features 30 recently acquired prints which, as the AGNS puts it, “serve as a testament to his innovative and experimental practice.” Edgerton (1903-1990) was an American artist and engineer recognized for his pioneering photographic work through the use of the stroboscope, capturing high-speed images of moving objects.

Also scheduled to open Dec. 1 at the Yarmouth gallery is an exhibition of Sable Island images by photographer Thaddeus Holownia, professor and head of the fine arts department at Mount Allison University.

Mark Kasumovic’s Picture/Perfect show “uses the tourist as a backdrop to explore the explosion of digital images as data in the information age,” the AGNS says. Kasumovic has done photo and video work “and the province’s tourist sites provided rich material for his artistic investigations.”

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