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Public encouraged to contribute info for Nova Scotia Bird Society’s Spring First Arrivals

The great blue heron typically arrives about mid-to-late March.
~ Alix d’Entremont
The great blue heron typically arrives about mid-to-late March. ~ Alix d’Entremont - Contributed

Initiative a citizen science initiative

YARMOUTH - 

The Nova Scotia Bird Society is collecting information and asking the public for assistance in recording spring’s first arrivals.

Climate change is impacting all forms of life, especially migrating birds. Are some species arriving earlier in the spring? Members of the Nova Scotia Bird Society (NSBS) believe so, but to know for sure, it’s keeping track of the dates migrants are making first landfall. The information is being shared with the public.

Osprey are usually seen around early April but one has already been recorded as arriving in March this year.  Alix d’Entremont
Osprey are usually seen around early April but one has already been recorded as arriving in March this year. Alix d’Entremont

 

Using observations submitted to eBird, Nova Scotia Birds, NatureNS and the NSBS Facebook page, a table on the NSBS website is being continually updated.

You can help add to the database this spring. If you've seen a species in the table on a date prior to the one listed, or if you've observed a species that has yet to be seen, let NSBS know.  

American woodcock was already sighted doing its flight displays on March 9, but other March arrivals include great blue heron and Wilson's snipe.

Visit the Spring First Arrivals chart

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