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Vogler’s Cove couple not giving up fight to stay in Canada

Kat and Dave Wright are doing everything they can to fight to stay in Canada after being issued a deportation order. Their next step is calling on the public for support to go to Ahmed Hussen, Canadian Minister of Immigration, who can allow them to stay on compassionate grounds.
Kat and Dave Wright are doing everything they can to fight to stay in Canada after being issued a deportation order. Their next step is calling on the public for support to go to Ahmed Hussen, Canadian Minister of Immigration, who can allow them to stay on compassionate grounds.

VOGLER'S COVE, N.S. - Kat and Dave Wright have lost all legal appeals to stay in Canada and now are turning to the public for help to get the ear of the federal minister of immigration.

The couple, who are both 74, were handed a deportation order back to the United States after losing their six-year legal battle with the Department of Immigration, which has ordered them back to their country of origin.

It’s not the outcome the Wrights hoped for.

 If we go to the United States we’ll be living in poverty,” says Kat Wright. “We have nothing there, no place to go. We would have to set up another household. Everything we own is here. We’re living right on the edge of what we can afford right now. Here, we’re settled. We own the house.”

The Wrights say they have an annual household income of between $20,000 and $30,000 through U.S. Social Security.

“We would continue to get that, but,  if we went back to the States,  a big chunk of that would be taken out to be paid for healthcare. Which means a lot less to find a place to live, all of the expenses of living,” Kat said. “We would really, I think, be thrown into poverty if we had to return.”

The Wrights say they are also afraid of the political climate in the United States with the election of President Donald Trump.  

“What’s happening in the United States right now is very frightening,” says Kat. “It scares the hell out of me. I think this man is heading for war and I can’t imagine being there in those circumstances.”

The Wrights moved to Canada from the U.S. in 1972 and became landed immigrants. Theysettled in Vogler’s Cove, a small community on Nova Scotia's South Shore, but, after five disastrous years lobster fishing,  Dave accepted a job in the U.S. The couple left and didn’t return to live in Canada for 35 years, losing their landed immigrant status.

Right now, the couple is going through a pre-removal risk assessment process, which will determine if there is a risk to them if they return to their original country.

In the meantime they’re starting a public campaign to garner support, not only from their small community in Vogler’s Cove but from anyone else who will come to their defence.

David says he and his wife aren’t taking anything away from Canada. Instead, they are giving back to their community, he says. And, although they use Canadian healthcare, they also pay Canadian taxes.

Already  people have been coming forward to help the Wrights. A non-practicing lawyer from Halifax has offered his services pro bono and their current lawyer, Lee Cohen, has accepted the help.

“Right now, we are collecting letters of support from as many people as we can, not only people who know us but people who understand what we’re facing and what the issues are,” says Kat. “Here we are; we’re committed to our community and they want to throw us out for a bureaucratic reason. It’s not good enough.”

Cohen is filing a humanitarian and compassionate application to the Immigration minister, who has the power to step in and reverse the removal order.

The couple, who are both 74, were handed a deportation order back to the United States after losing their six-year legal battle with the Department of Immigration, which has ordered them back to their country of origin.

It’s not the outcome the Wrights hoped for.

 If we go to the United States we’ll be living in poverty,” says Kat Wright. “We have nothing there, no place to go. We would have to set up another household. Everything we own is here. We’re living right on the edge of what we can afford right now. Here, we’re settled. We own the house.”

The Wrights say they have an annual household income of between $20,000 and $30,000 through U.S. Social Security.

“We would continue to get that, but,  if we went back to the States,  a big chunk of that would be taken out to be paid for healthcare. Which means a lot less to find a place to live, all of the expenses of living,” Kat said. “We would really, I think, be thrown into poverty if we had to return.”

The Wrights say they are also afraid of the political climate in the United States with the election of President Donald Trump.  

“What’s happening in the United States right now is very frightening,” says Kat. “It scares the hell out of me. I think this man is heading for war and I can’t imagine being there in those circumstances.”

The Wrights moved to Canada from the U.S. in 1972 and became landed immigrants. Theysettled in Vogler’s Cove, a small community on Nova Scotia's South Shore, but, after five disastrous years lobster fishing,  Dave accepted a job in the U.S. The couple left and didn’t return to live in Canada for 35 years, losing their landed immigrant status.

Right now, the couple is going through a pre-removal risk assessment process, which will determine if there is a risk to them if they return to their original country.

In the meantime they’re starting a public campaign to garner support, not only from their small community in Vogler’s Cove but from anyone else who will come to their defence.

David says he and his wife aren’t taking anything away from Canada. Instead, they are giving back to their community, he says. And, although they use Canadian healthcare, they also pay Canadian taxes.

Already  people have been coming forward to help the Wrights. A non-practicing lawyer from Halifax has offered his services pro bono and their current lawyer, Lee Cohen, has accepted the help.

“Right now, we are collecting letters of support from as many people as we can, not only people who know us but people who understand what we’re facing and what the issues are,” says Kat. “Here we are; we’re committed to our community and they want to throw us out for a bureaucratic reason. It’s not good enough.”

Cohen is filing a humanitarian and compassionate application to the Immigration minister, who has the power to step in and reverse the removal order.

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