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Keeping seniors and dogs together in Southwest Nova

<p>Patricia Rhyno is the first to adopt a senior dog through ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd. She says 11-year-old Champ is a wonderful companion.</p>
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<p>Patricia Rhyno is the first to adopt a senior dog through ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd. She says 11-year-old Champ is a wonderful companion.</p> <br />

TUSKET - The white hair around his eyes and a slight shakiness in movement is an indication of his age. But Champ is like a puppy in many other ways.

The 11-year-old is the first senior dog to be adopted out through the ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd chapter.

The new chapter is holding a meeting on June 22, at 7 p.m. at the Par-en-Bas school’s library in Tusket. Elderdog founder Ardra Cole will be visiting from Lunenburg to do a presentation.

The organization is active in four provinces, with 200 volunteers who help seniors with daily dog care, fostering and/or adopting older dogs, providing long-term care planning for companion dogs, bereavement and commemoration and perpetual care.

Yarmouth County resident Becky Rhyno recently stepped up as communications and fundraising officer for the local chapter. She’s hoping to connect with members from the “helping community” and spread awareness of Elderdog’s value in the region.

This includes the RCMP, EHS, Mental Health Services, recreation services, home care, VON, continuing care, clergy, housing authority, municipal units, senior security officers and adult protection services.

Rhyno says she chose ElderDog (ED) as an organization to volunteer with because she has always wanted to give back by volunteering but couldn't find her niche. “When I heard about ED it sounded like a perfect fit for me, I love dogs, have two of my own and a love for seniors.”

The goal of the group, first and foremost, she says, is to assist seniors and their dogs to remain together as long as possible. “Yarmouth and the tri-counties have a large population of seniors, many who do not have families to help them with things such as exercising their dogs, taking their dogs to the veterinarian etc.

“The importance of seniors being able to keep their dogs as long as is physically possible can't be measured,” she said.

She says many studies have shown that pets reduce stress, provide companionship and contribute to the overall wellness of seniors.

Some may hesitate welcoming a senior dog into their lives, knowing the inevitable death to old age may happen sooner and that more vet bills may be associated with care.

Rhyno believes the love and companionship that an older dog can bring to anyone, senior or not, can't be measured in monetary value.

“My Chocolate Labrador is almost 10 years old and I can say without hesitation that she has been my most loyal and compassionate friend,” she said.

For more information about ElderDog call toll free 855-336-4226 or visit online.

ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd also has a Facebook Page.

 

3 benefits of pets

The following is from National Centre for Health Research studies:

1. Findings show that the simple act of stroking a pet can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol.

2. Studies suggest that the social support a pet provides can make a person feel more relaxed and decrease stress.

3. The social support provided by a pet might also encourage more social interactions with people, reducing feelings of isolation or loneliness.

The 11-year-old is the first senior dog to be adopted out through the ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd chapter.

The new chapter is holding a meeting on June 22, at 7 p.m. at the Par-en-Bas school’s library in Tusket. Elderdog founder Ardra Cole will be visiting from Lunenburg to do a presentation.

The organization is active in four provinces, with 200 volunteers who help seniors with daily dog care, fostering and/or adopting older dogs, providing long-term care planning for companion dogs, bereavement and commemoration and perpetual care.

Yarmouth County resident Becky Rhyno recently stepped up as communications and fundraising officer for the local chapter. She’s hoping to connect with members from the “helping community” and spread awareness of Elderdog’s value in the region.

This includes the RCMP, EHS, Mental Health Services, recreation services, home care, VON, continuing care, clergy, housing authority, municipal units, senior security officers and adult protection services.

Rhyno says she chose ElderDog (ED) as an organization to volunteer with because she has always wanted to give back by volunteering but couldn't find her niche. “When I heard about ED it sounded like a perfect fit for me, I love dogs, have two of my own and a love for seniors.”

The goal of the group, first and foremost, she says, is to assist seniors and their dogs to remain together as long as possible. “Yarmouth and the tri-counties have a large population of seniors, many who do not have families to help them with things such as exercising their dogs, taking their dogs to the veterinarian etc.

“The importance of seniors being able to keep their dogs as long as is physically possible can't be measured,” she said.

She says many studies have shown that pets reduce stress, provide companionship and contribute to the overall wellness of seniors.

Some may hesitate welcoming a senior dog into their lives, knowing the inevitable death to old age may happen sooner and that more vet bills may be associated with care.

Rhyno believes the love and companionship that an older dog can bring to anyone, senior or not, can't be measured in monetary value.

“My Chocolate Labrador is almost 10 years old and I can say without hesitation that she has been my most loyal and compassionate friend,” she said.

For more information about ElderDog call toll free 855-336-4226 or visit online.

ElderDog Canada Southwest Nova Pawd also has a Facebook Page.

 

3 benefits of pets

The following is from National Centre for Health Research studies:

1. Findings show that the simple act of stroking a pet can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol.

2. Studies suggest that the social support a pet provides can make a person feel more relaxed and decrease stress.

3. The social support provided by a pet might also encourage more social interactions with people, reducing feelings of isolation or loneliness.

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