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King’s-Edgehill School withdrawing support from arena project

King’s-Edgehill School headmaster Joe Seagram, left, and Dill Farm owner Danny Dill make a presentation during a recent committee of the whole meeting about the hockey heritage museum and arena.
King’s-Edgehill School headmaster Joe Seagram, left, and Dill Farm owner Danny Dill make a presentation during a recent committee of the whole meeting about the hockey heritage museum and arena.

WINDSOR, N.S. - In a letter submitted to Windsor and West Hants councils, King’s-Edgehill School headmaster Joe Seagram said the private school would no longer participate in the arena project.

After describing how the community is divided on the proposed new Hockey Heritage Centre, Seagram said it's not the school's intent to cause further divide.

“Like any business in our area, it is King’s-Edgehill School’s hope that this community thrives economically, culturally, and politically. When asked for assistance, we believe it is our role to help as much as we can. It is not our role to influence politics, take sides, or - as is the case right now - to support one proposal or one location, over another,” the letter reads.

“Thus, King’s-Edgehill School withdraws any offers of support and commitments of any kind it may have made in writing or verbally at any time with regards to the Cooperstown North vision and Hockey Heritage Centre project.”

KES had previously committed $1 million towards an arena/heritage centre concept to be located near Long Pond in Windsor, which is close to the school’s grounds. The province and two municipal units also committed funds towards that project. The cost carried a price tag of about $12 million.

This is an artistic rendering of what a new arena could look like if it was located at the Hants County Exhibition Grounds in Windsor.

A counter proposal from the Windsor Agricultural Society released earlier this month said they could build the facility for less money, approximately $9 million, and required no major infrastructure improvements, like road upgrades.

Seagram said in a brief interview on April 25 that he felt the project has become divisive in the community.

“We’re just so uncomfortable with this situation. The community can decide where it wants to go, but this is not a King’s-Edgehill project,” Seagram said. “It should never have had that name attached to it. It is something that will be owned by the municipal unit(s). It will not be owned or operated by us in any way.”

Seagram said both proposals, Long Pond and the Hants County Exhibition Grounds, have merit.

“The community is divided and it feels like we’re caught in the middle,” he added.

Seagram said KES, like any business in town, would support any initiative that helps Windsor.

He said that he hasn’t reviewed the agricultural society’s proposal yet, and couldn’t comment on that.

More to come.

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