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The bell tolls for Judge Gregory Lenehan during second Halifax protest of the week

A crowd gathered at Grand Parade on Wednesday for silence and also to howl in response to Judge Lenehan's ruling.
A crowd gathered at Grand Parade on Wednesday for silence and also to howl in response to Judge Lenehan's ruling.

A large group of people stand silently as rain comes down on them at Grand Parade.

Their homemade signs, each with a message of power and anger, wave and droop in the wind.

Only the sound of the city is audible, as cars and buses drive by the square.

Suddenly, a large bell is rung and the city sounds are drowned out as the angry howl of a hundred people fills the air.

The bell is rung again, and demands are shouted into a megaphone for all to hear.

A final bell ring and the crowd quietly leaves, the square silent once again.

Fast and direct was the plan for Wednesday’s protest against Judge Gregory Lenehan, the second in as many days, and although it was short, the message was clear – people are angry.

Lenehan’s conduct and decision on the Bassam Al-Rawi sexual assault case has resulted in a handful of protests, group meetings and petitions calling for Lenehan’s removal.

The protests and petitions have been vital in getting everyone’s attention, and what comes next will depend on the action of the government and the courts, said Chelsea Fougére, organizer of Wednesday’s protest.

“I hope this ends with Al-Rawi being convicted and registered in the national sex offender registry, and Judge Gregory Lenehan is disbarred. He has demonstrated in multiple cases he is an enabler of violence,” Fougére said.

“The message he has sent out to everyone is sexual assault is ok, and that people ask for it.”

She hopes the protests and petitions will move people and bring awareness to the problem of sexual assault.

“This type of thing is absolutely ubiquitous,” Fougére said.

“We all know it and I think if we’re not suffering in that together, then we are on our own. It’s an issue that touches us all.”

Their homemade signs, each with a message of power and anger, wave and droop in the wind.

Only the sound of the city is audible, as cars and buses drive by the square.

Suddenly, a large bell is rung and the city sounds are drowned out as the angry howl of a hundred people fills the air.

The bell is rung again, and demands are shouted into a megaphone for all to hear.

A final bell ring and the crowd quietly leaves, the square silent once again.

Fast and direct was the plan for Wednesday’s protest against Judge Gregory Lenehan, the second in as many days, and although it was short, the message was clear – people are angry.

Lenehan’s conduct and decision on the Bassam Al-Rawi sexual assault case has resulted in a handful of protests, group meetings and petitions calling for Lenehan’s removal.

The protests and petitions have been vital in getting everyone’s attention, and what comes next will depend on the action of the government and the courts, said Chelsea Fougére, organizer of Wednesday’s protest.

“I hope this ends with Al-Rawi being convicted and registered in the national sex offender registry, and Judge Gregory Lenehan is disbarred. He has demonstrated in multiple cases he is an enabler of violence,” Fougére said.

“The message he has sent out to everyone is sexual assault is ok, and that people ask for it.”

She hopes the protests and petitions will move people and bring awareness to the problem of sexual assault.

“This type of thing is absolutely ubiquitous,” Fougére said.

“We all know it and I think if we’re not suffering in that together, then we are on our own. It’s an issue that touches us all.”

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