Top News

Yarmouth's Allie Munroe named captain of Nova Scotia's Canada Games hockey team

Allie Munroe of Yarmouth has been selected captain of Team Nova Scotia's women's hockey team for the Canada Games and has also been awarded a four-year, athletic scholarship to play Division 1 NCAA hockey at Syracuse University. TINA COMEAU PHOTO
Allie Munroe of Yarmouth has been selected captain of Team Nova Scotia's women's hockey team for the Canada Games and has also been awarded a four-year, athletic scholarship to play Division 1 NCAA hockey at Syracuse University. TINA COMEAU PHOTO

It’s in Yarmouth that Allie Munroe grew up playing hockey, but it’s her skill and talent on the ice that continues to open up doors for her well beyond her hometown.

The latest opportunity will see Munroe representing Nova Scotia as part of the women’s hockey team competing at the 2015 Canada Winter Games in Prince George, British Columbia in February.

Not only is Munroe, 17, a member of the team, she’s also been named captain of the squad.

And while Munroe – the daughter of Linda and Maurice Munroe – has played on provincial teams before (competing with these teams in Atlantic tournaments) she is really looking forward to the opportunity to represent Nova Scotia at a national event.

Women’s hockey gets underway at the Canada Games on Friday, Feb. 13 with practices. Nova Scotia’s first preliminary game against Alberta is set for Feb. 14. The gold medal game will be played on Feb. 20. Rounding out Pool B with Nova Scotia and Alberta are teams from Quebec and Saskatchewan.

Munroe has always enjoyed playing on provincial teams. The friendships she’s made rank amongst her greatest memories, she says, and that the competition is at a high caliber very much appeals to her.

It’s always been this way.

Playing minor hockey in the Yarmouth County Minor Hockey Association, Munroe strived to play at the highest levels, even when it came to peewee AAA where she’d be playing on the ice with the boys where checking was involved. More often than not, though, she was the one throwing the hit.

This continued on into bantam, when she played bantam major with the Western Hurricanes.

When she reached the midget division stage, however, Munroe decided to take a break from playing with the guys and turn her attention to female hockey. Since then she’s been attending New Hampton School, a prep school in New Hampshire.

Being so far away from home is difficult, she says, and it really causes her to appreciate the town she’s from.

She refers to growing up in a small town when asked to offer advice to other young hockey players, particularly females, who are hoping to seize hockey opportunities in their future.

“A couple of things that I really learned was obviously to never give up, and to remember where you come from,” Munroe says. “From a small town it’s maybe not as easy to get noticed so you can’t give up. Hard work is what’s going to get you to where you want to be at the end of the day, with anything in life, not just hockey.

“Just dream big,” she says.

In preparation for the Canada Winter Games, evaluation and training camps for the Nova Scotia team began last spring and were also held over the summer. The last camp was held in December. Munroe says the next time they’ll all be together as a team won’t be until the players arrive in British Columbia next month.

Asked how she learned she had been selected captain of the team, Munroe says it occurred during a team meal at a restaurant.

“The waiter came out with a little cake and they asked if there was an Allie Munroe here and they announced that I was captain and gave me the cake with a ‘C’ on it,” she says.

Referring to the Winter Games and playing on likely her last Nova Scotia team she says, “It will be the last hurrah before I’m done.”

But when it comes to hockey, Munroe is far from being done. She’s been awarded a four-year, full athletic scholarship to play Division 1 NCAA women's hockey at Syracuse University in the state of New York beginning in the fall.

She’s looking to enroll in an arts and sciences program, with an emphasis on psychology, although she’s leaving her academic options open. Playing Division 1 college hockey in the States was a goal Munroe set for herself years ago. “I definitely have hopes for that,” she had told this newspaper in a 2013 interview.

But again, being away from home is tough.

“Yeah, it’s hard and sometimes I get homesick,” she says. “But it’s really exciting to come home because you really appreciate where you’re from. It makes me really appreciate Yarmouth.”

Because not only will Munroe be representing Nova Scotia at the Canada Winter games, she’ll be representing her hometown as well.

 

NOTE TO READERS: Another Yarmouth athlete will be competing at the Canada Winter Games. Ryan Shay is on Team Nova Scotia's wheelchair basketball team. You can read that story here.

The latest opportunity will see Munroe representing Nova Scotia as part of the women’s hockey team competing at the 2015 Canada Winter Games in Prince George, British Columbia in February.

Not only is Munroe, 17, a member of the team, she’s also been named captain of the squad.

And while Munroe – the daughter of Linda and Maurice Munroe – has played on provincial teams before (competing with these teams in Atlantic tournaments) she is really looking forward to the opportunity to represent Nova Scotia at a national event.

Women’s hockey gets underway at the Canada Games on Friday, Feb. 13 with practices. Nova Scotia’s first preliminary game against Alberta is set for Feb. 14. The gold medal game will be played on Feb. 20. Rounding out Pool B with Nova Scotia and Alberta are teams from Quebec and Saskatchewan.

Munroe has always enjoyed playing on provincial teams. The friendships she’s made rank amongst her greatest memories, she says, and that the competition is at a high caliber very much appeals to her.

It’s always been this way.

Playing minor hockey in the Yarmouth County Minor Hockey Association, Munroe strived to play at the highest levels, even when it came to peewee AAA where she’d be playing on the ice with the boys where checking was involved. More often than not, though, she was the one throwing the hit.

This continued on into bantam, when she played bantam major with the Western Hurricanes.

When she reached the midget division stage, however, Munroe decided to take a break from playing with the guys and turn her attention to female hockey. Since then she’s been attending New Hampton School, a prep school in New Hampshire.

Being so far away from home is difficult, she says, and it really causes her to appreciate the town she’s from.

She refers to growing up in a small town when asked to offer advice to other young hockey players, particularly females, who are hoping to seize hockey opportunities in their future.

“A couple of things that I really learned was obviously to never give up, and to remember where you come from,” Munroe says. “From a small town it’s maybe not as easy to get noticed so you can’t give up. Hard work is what’s going to get you to where you want to be at the end of the day, with anything in life, not just hockey.

“Just dream big,” she says.

In preparation for the Canada Winter Games, evaluation and training camps for the Nova Scotia team began last spring and were also held over the summer. The last camp was held in December. Munroe says the next time they’ll all be together as a team won’t be until the players arrive in British Columbia next month.

Asked how she learned she had been selected captain of the team, Munroe says it occurred during a team meal at a restaurant.

“The waiter came out with a little cake and they asked if there was an Allie Munroe here and they announced that I was captain and gave me the cake with a ‘C’ on it,” she says.

Referring to the Winter Games and playing on likely her last Nova Scotia team she says, “It will be the last hurrah before I’m done.”

But when it comes to hockey, Munroe is far from being done. She’s been awarded a four-year, full athletic scholarship to play Division 1 NCAA women's hockey at Syracuse University in the state of New York beginning in the fall.

She’s looking to enroll in an arts and sciences program, with an emphasis on psychology, although she’s leaving her academic options open. Playing Division 1 college hockey in the States was a goal Munroe set for herself years ago. “I definitely have hopes for that,” she had told this newspaper in a 2013 interview.

But again, being away from home is tough.

“Yeah, it’s hard and sometimes I get homesick,” she says. “But it’s really exciting to come home because you really appreciate where you’re from. It makes me really appreciate Yarmouth.”

Because not only will Munroe be representing Nova Scotia at the Canada Winter games, she’ll be representing her hometown as well.

 

NOTE TO READERS: Another Yarmouth athlete will be competing at the Canada Winter Games. Ryan Shay is on Team Nova Scotia's wheelchair basketball team. You can read that story here.

Recent Stories