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Yarmouth's U18 battle for soccer provincials sees two OTs and a shootout


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By Tina Comeau

THE VANGUARD

www.thevanguard.ca

 

The U18 Yarmouth Clippers soccer team stood on the field with their arms locked around each other’s shoulders.

One by one players stepped up in front of the net, lined the soccer ball up in front of the opposing keeper, set the ball on the ground and hoped for the best.

After a 1-1 tie at the end of regulation play. After two scoreless overtimes. Now it had come down to this. Penalty shots.

The team with the most goals in five attempts would move onto provincials.

No pressure.

Yeah...right.

Yarmouth’s first shot hit the crossbar of the net. No goal.

Chester’s first attempt his its mark.

Yarmouth’s second shot reached the back of the net.

Chester’s second try? Wide of the net. No goal.

Another 1-1 tie.

Yarmouth’s third try couldn’t get past the Chester keeper. Chester’s third attempt beat the Yarmouth keeper and the visiting team was up by a goal.

Both teams missed their fourth attempt.

Eventually someone would have to lose this game. Eventually someone would have to win. Yarmouth’s last penalty shot couldn’t reach the back of the net. And so Chester advanced to provincials.

Incidentally, Yarmouth’s lone goal during the regulation part of the game had come off of a penalty shot, scored by Alex Christie, which had tied the game 1-1.

At the conclusion of the game league awards were handed out, in addition to medals for Chester's first-place finish and Yarmouth's second place. Yarmouth’s keeper Colton Smith received the hardware for the league's top goalie.

During the overtimes both teams had unbelievable opportunities on net to end the game. Yarmouth’s best chance came when the Chester keeper came well outside of the box, to the left of the net, to play the ball. He stumbled and fell, leaving the net completely vulnerable for a Yarmouth attack. But as the ball flew, and as bodies flew, Chester managed to stave off a Yarmouth victory.

At the other end of the field there was a similar scramble a few minutes later in front of the Yarmouth net. From the spectators’ vantage point the ball appeared destined to go into the net. Not so! Then it was heading into the net again. Nope! And again. Still out!

Bodies were flying, legs were kicking, players were dropping. And it was nearly as exhausting to watch from the side. Others couldn’t bear to watch. Some parents turned away and closed their eyes. Saying a silent prayer to themselves, perhaps?

Both scrambles in front of the nets left people on the sidelines saying out loud, “How did that not go in?” On the field as players placed their hands on their heads, throwing their heads back in disbelief, you could tell they were wondering the same thing.

And depending on which side of the scramble the players were on, you could almost also hear a collective “Phew.”

And then came the dreaded end-of-game shootout, which is always a tough way to lose a game. Especially this one.

With their eventual loss the Yarmouth Clippers won’t go on to represent South Shore at provincials.

There’s always next year.

 

 

 

By Tina Comeau

THE VANGUARD

www.thevanguard.ca

 

The U18 Yarmouth Clippers soccer team stood on the field with their arms locked around each other’s shoulders.

One by one players stepped up in front of the net, lined the soccer ball up in front of the opposing keeper, set the ball on the ground and hoped for the best.

After a 1-1 tie at the end of regulation play. After two scoreless overtimes. Now it had come down to this. Penalty shots.

The team with the most goals in five attempts would move onto provincials.

No pressure.

Yeah...right.

Yarmouth’s first shot hit the crossbar of the net. No goal.

Chester’s first attempt his its mark.

Yarmouth’s second shot reached the back of the net.

Chester’s second try? Wide of the net. No goal.

Another 1-1 tie.

Yarmouth’s third try couldn’t get past the Chester keeper. Chester’s third attempt beat the Yarmouth keeper and the visiting team was up by a goal.

Both teams missed their fourth attempt.

Eventually someone would have to lose this game. Eventually someone would have to win. Yarmouth’s last penalty shot couldn’t reach the back of the net. And so Chester advanced to provincials.

Incidentally, Yarmouth’s lone goal during the regulation part of the game had come off of a penalty shot, scored by Alex Christie, which had tied the game 1-1.

At the conclusion of the game league awards were handed out, in addition to medals for Chester's first-place finish and Yarmouth's second place. Yarmouth’s keeper Colton Smith received the hardware for the league's top goalie.

During the overtimes both teams had unbelievable opportunities on net to end the game. Yarmouth’s best chance came when the Chester keeper came well outside of the box, to the left of the net, to play the ball. He stumbled and fell, leaving the net completely vulnerable for a Yarmouth attack. But as the ball flew, and as bodies flew, Chester managed to stave off a Yarmouth victory.

At the other end of the field there was a similar scramble a few minutes later in front of the Yarmouth net. From the spectators’ vantage point the ball appeared destined to go into the net. Not so! Then it was heading into the net again. Nope! And again. Still out!

Bodies were flying, legs were kicking, players were dropping. And it was nearly as exhausting to watch from the side. Others couldn’t bear to watch. Some parents turned away and closed their eyes. Saying a silent prayer to themselves, perhaps?

Both scrambles in front of the nets left people on the sidelines saying out loud, “How did that not go in?” On the field as players placed their hands on their heads, throwing their heads back in disbelief, you could tell they were wondering the same thing.

And depending on which side of the scramble the players were on, you could almost also hear a collective “Phew.”

And then came the dreaded end-of-game shootout, which is always a tough way to lose a game. Especially this one.

With their eventual loss the Yarmouth Clippers won’t go on to represent South Shore at provincials.

There’s always next year.

 

 

 

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